Vendulka Prchalová – I torture it till it speaks to me

Vendulka Prchalová’s realisations are characterised by a high degree of experimentation and an unorthodox approach to the material, which she bends and shapes in an almost “torturous” way. There is no cruelty in the creative process and the artist’s approach, but rather the need to achieve a certain shape and articulation of one’s own feelings and thoughts, reflecting also societal themes, insecurities, anxieties or desires. In her work she combines glass with other materials such as metal, ink and plaster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the autumn of 2022, she graduated from the doctoral program at the Academy of Arts and Crafts in Prague in the Glass Studio under the supervision of Rony Plesl. In her dissertation, Směsi/Mixtures, the author explored innovative concepts of materials and processes for the production of moulds for moulded sculptures. Shortly thereafter, she completed a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School, an international centre for glass education in Washington, USA. She has presented her work in numerous international exhibitions and competitions. Last year, her works were on display at the exhibition Czech Glass, Quo Vadis?!, which was part of Venice Glass Week. During the show, the artist’s works were selected for the exhibition section of The Venice Glass Week HUB Under 35, and she won the main prize of the expert jury for her presentation in this section.

Klára Horáčková – Layers

Klára Horáčková’s glass art can be divided into two specific artistic approaches. The first is traditional, while the second is conceptual. Horáčková’s conceptual glass art breaks free of traditional notions of glass as a material that is closer to the world of design than experimental art. Which is why her works cannot be characterised by a single visual style or a single linear line of development. Rather, they are defined by experimentation that enables a wide scope of artistic expression.

Met II, 2002, kiln formed glass, author´s technique, 32 x 15 cm, Foto © Gabriel Urbánek

Met IV, 2002, kiln formed glass, author´s technique, 24 x 15 cm, Foto © Gabriel Urbánek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The most recent set of art objects and vases by Klára Horáčková goes under the name of Vrstvy (Layers) and ties in to past series titled Evolution and Artificial Landscapes, which utilised the technologies of fusing and moulding prefabricated glass tubes. The principle of layering repeating elements, in this case in the form of icy greenish sheet glass, places these objects precisely on the threshold between art and design. On the one hand, the works fulfil the function of vases, on the other they represent abstract models filled with unusual architectural constructions.

And it is this very diversity of artistic expression by Klára Horáčková, along with an integration of conceptual and classical approaches, that creates a sense of rooted regularity amidst all the experimentation. Her projects represent the overlapping layers of flowing ideas, one after the other, always offering something original and unique.

Met I, 2002, kiln formed glass, author´s technique, 28 x 15 cm, Foto © Gabriel Urbánek

Klára Horáčková (born 1980) is a graduate of Vladimír Kopecký’s Glass Studio at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague (UMPRUM), also working there, since 2011, as an expert assistant at the Rony Plesl Glass Studio. Aside from the Czech Republic, in recent years her works have also been displayed in locations such as London, Eindhoven, Paris, Venice and Lommel.

BAROQUE GRANARY AT LEMBERK OPENS FOR ITS FIRST SEASON WITH EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITION FOR THE PUBLIC

After extensive renovations, the former granary building has acquired a new roof and will open for the first time this summer season with a new exhibition. Under the guidance of architect and actor David Vávra, the Granary’s owners, Lucie Havlová and Tomáš Hendrych, together with photographer Tomáš Princ and a team of collaborators have created an exhibition titled Lemberk: Step by Step, which explores the historic sites in the Granary’s vicinity, both well-known and obscure.

Fourteen Eyelids and Roof Renovation

Last year, the Lemberk Granary project first came to attention by presenting a pre-season exhibition of sculptures by Čestmír Suška. It was, however, confined only to the outside of the building; the poor condition of the roof meant it was not safe to be inside the building. After the reconstruction work, which took place mainly in the autumn of last year and continues this year, the roof is secured. A company specializing in the repair of historic buildings completely replaced the roof covering, including the ridge tiles, battens and gutters on the south-west side. The roof truss components have also been repaired in the process, by cutting out and replacing parts of the roof ties. The reconstruction also involved the replacement of the skew rafters, damaged tie beams, and the completely missing wall plate. The brickwork of cornices was repaired and completed.

What other renovations have been planned for the near future? Depending on the amount of funding available for the next stage, plans include demolition of the original entrance and installing oak doors, and possibly flooring refurbishment on the ground floor. A probe has uncovered an old wooden floor underneath the existing floorboards. Plans are also in the work for building sanitary facilities, cleaning the well, adding toilets with a shower stall, and installing a sewage pipe with a septic tank, all of which is crucial for making the building habitable again.

Photo: Tomáš Hendrych – An eyelid dormer is a low and wide dormer with a curved roof and no sides, where the roof covering is gradually curved up and over the dormer in a flattened bell curve. Creating a dormer is a difficult enough task for a roofer; but building an eyelid dormer is a challenge that requires a true master of the roofing craft. The roof tiles need to be adjusted and laid in such a way as to prevent water from seeping under the tiles and causing the roof to leak. Similarly, battens need to ensure a smooth transition of the dormer’s arch to the roof surface.